Creativity, Cultural Change, Cultural Traits, Culture, Human Nature, Ideas, Invention, Life, Literature, Love, Lovers, Memes, New Idea, New Love, Poetry, Quality of Life, Relationships, Romantic Love, Writing

Will Tomorrow Bring a Better Love?

(About a 1 minute read)

Over a thousand years ago, a handful of Persian and Arabic court poets created a new way of looking at one of the seven or eight kinds of love.  Today we still see that kind of love largely through their eyes.  We call it “romantic love”.

Of course romantic love has been around since the first homo sapiens — and most likely even before them.  It’s as old as the yellow grasses of Africa.  But it has not always been seen — it has not always been understood — in the way we see and understand it today.

Here’s a thought for you.  The world is coming together and I think it is likely that quite soon, some group of “poets” will create a new way of looking at love — one suited to a global culture.  But if that wild idea comes true, then hold your breath!  How people see love influences how they love.

If and when a new way of seeing love comes about — will that way be overall a good thing for the world, or a bad thing?

In my opinion, it could go either way.


For more on this topic, see this post.

Art, Creativity, Cultural Change, Cultural Traits, Culture, Human Nature, Ideas, Invention, Life, Literature, Love, Lovers, Memes, New Idea, New Love, Poetry, Relationships, Writing

“East and West”: A Love Story for the 21st Century

(About a 3 minute read)

We all know the story.  Boy meets girl, they fall in love.  They fight.  Then make up.  Then pair off  forever and ever.

Puke me a river of boredom.  The story has been repeated more often than Trump’s stupidity.  Besides, it’s totally outdated.   Totally outdated.

It’s outdated because it is basically a Western story — and we living a world now where “we” are no longer just and only the West.  Think about it.  Isn’t it time for a new kind of love story?  One that combines — that synthesizes — the great motifs of both East and West?

In a way, it does not matter what you and I think the time has come for.  It’s going to happen anyway.  The world is already too globalized for it not to happen.  There will be an East/West love story someday — and probably someday soon.   A story that has elements of the old Western story, but also much that is new to the West.

Why do I think so?

Maybe the easy way to put is this: In the West, you love an individual.  You love what is unique, special about someone. . In other words, you love Jim, and no one will do but Jim.  Or Melinda, etc.  If you, dear reader, are from the West, that’s all common sense, right?

But traditionally, it was different in the East.  Traditionally, you do not love the individual there.  You do not love whatever it is about them that makes them one of a kind.  Instead, you love the universal in someone.  The timeless, unchanging, eternal in them.  The thing they have in common with everyone else.

Don’t believe me?  I had once had a professor who now and then would read traditional Indian love stories to us.  Every hero is the same.  Every heroine is the same.  Story to story to story.  Only the moral of he stories ever changes. Only the moral.

Of course there are Western style love stories all over the East these days — but guess where they came from?

I will wager that someone soon is going to create a true synthesis of East and West when it comes to love stories.  Something that will worldwide replace the individualism of “She’s the only one in the whole world for me” — but also replace the universalism of “He’s interchangeable with any ranking member of his cast or class or clan.”

By the way, look not just for a new story, look even more for a new way of thinking about what it means to love someone.  That will be the real change.  The real synthesis.  Not the plot, but the new vision of what love is.

Just a thought for the day.  Y’all can go back to being sane now.

 

Art, Honesty, Literature, Poetry, Quotes, Shreya Vikram, Wisdom, Writing

“Shy Writers Die.”

“Shy writers die.”  — Shreya Vikram (in an email to Paul Sunstone).

“The moment you feel that, just possibly, you’re walking down the street naked, exposing too much of your heart and your mind and what exists on the inside, showing too much of yourself.  That’s the moment you may be starting to get it right.”  — Neil Gaiman.

Aesthetics, Communication, Ideas, INCOMING!, Language, Learning, Literature, New Idea, Poetry, Quotes, Writing

The Trade-Off

“The fewer the words, the more they punch.

“The fewer the words, the less anyone hears something new.

“Two hundred and eighty-eight characters are for those who would repeat to me what is already in my head.

“Economize when telling me what I already know, but speak whatever volumes you must to show me new worlds.”

— Paul Sunstone (I have spoken, your turn now).

Art, Authenticity, Beauty, Being True To Yourself, Blundering Criticisms, Critiques, Free Spirit, Life, Living, Nature, Observation, Outstanding Bloggers, People, Photography, Quality of Life, Robin, Spirituality, The Art of Living Well, Well Being, Writing

Walking With Robin

(About a 2 minute read)

“The morning sunlight, in the spring, bounces off the sconces on the pendulum lights [in my kitchen] and creates a star-like pattern on the ceiling.  It’s a signal that spring has arrived.” — Robin, Breezes at Dawn Blog [Brackets Paul’s].

Anyone wishing to find his or her own true voice — but who is uncertain what that means — would do well to study Robin’s posts on her blog, Breezes at Dawn.

Of course, it is nearly impossible today to express a wholly new idea, especially outside the sciences.  Those who do now and then manage to come up with something even approaching a wholly new idea tend to be keen observers, rather than creative alone.

Robin is quite obviously a keen observer (see above quote), but — offhand — I can’t recall her expressing any more original ideas than the rest of us.  What makes her voice her own are not the ideas she expresses, but the virtually unique and special way in which she expresses them.

In short, her style.

Continue reading “Walking With Robin”

About This Blog, Writing

Paul’s Random, Annoying Question of the Moment

Why do you blog?

About a dozen years ago, my therapist got it into his twisted and warped mind (we’re highly compatible, Arun and I) to nag me to blog until one or the other of us was defeated in exhaustion. Took him six months, but he won.

But if that were all there was to it nowadays, I would post maybe twice, maybe three times a month.  I post far more often than that (during my active periods).  So why lay on the work of posting up to five times a day — or even more?

Too many reasons now to list them all in a short post. But perhaps this one will interest you. Writing is the best way I know of to clarify something — so long as you write honestly.  The only time writing to clarify has ever failed to make things at least a little bit clearer to me is when I’ve strayed from the path of honesty.

Beyond that, writing to an audience (as opposed to merely writing to myself) is the best way I know of discovering my best voice.

By “best voice”, I mean the most honest self-expression I can manage and still communicate with at least one other person in this world.

The way I see it, to communicate we much compromise.  Compromise between the truth as we see it, and the ability of someone else to “get” what we say about it.  Words are like that.  Words by their most fundamental nature force that compromise upon us.

In blogging, I have discovered an excellent way to find and learn to express my best voice.

Does any of that make sense?

Why do you blog?

Art, Culture, Ideas, Literature, Poetry, Writing

What is Poetry?

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Paul offers his own way of distinguishing between prose and poetry in response to a question from a friend.

♦♦♦

THE CRITICS THIRST FOR MORE! “‘What is Poetry?’ is a block of dry ice.  It chills the reader’s heart.  It freezes the reader’s mind.  And when it at last evaporates, the reader is left without so much as a single drop of water to drink.”  — Arun Ghani, India’s Blogs and Beyond, “The Herald and News”, Hyderabad, India.

THE CRITICS COMPARE!  “In his post, ‘What is Poetry?’, Paul Sunstone reveals he possesses the aesthetic sensibilities of a public toilet.  No, that is not quite it. That is not precisely it. It can be said with greater justice and with much greater precision that the Grand American Fraud of Blogging reveals himself to be possessed, demonically possessed, by the aesthetic sensibilities of a public toilet; a men’s public toilet, and not one that the cleaners have recently visited.” — Aloyse Leblanc, Le Critique Passionné de Blog, “La Tribune Linville”, Linville, France.

Continue reading “What is Poetry?”