Art, Blog Awards, Blundering Criticisms, Critiques, From Around the Net, Gifts for Comments, Jane Paterson Basil, Poetry

I Need Your Help With a Housewarming Party!

I need your help to hold a housewarming party for Jane Basil at her new blog.  The door prize for helping out is a 30 USD shopping trip on Amazon.

If I came across a Jane Basil poem published in the Oxford Companion to English Poetry, I would not think it out of place.

Skeptical?  Go and read Promises!  Read just that one Basil poem.  Then tell me whether you concur with me.  Your call, but please don’t make your call until at least you have read Promises.

Continue reading “I Need Your Help With a Housewarming Party!”

Critiques, From Around the Net, Poetry

“A Broken Dream”, by Ramyani Bhattacharya

The first thing to strike me about A Broken Dream by Ramyani Bhattacharya is the imagery, the vibrant, sensuous imagery.  Her imagery made me feel her words.

The other of the top two things to strike me about her poem was the poignancy of its ending verses.

Strikingly beautiful, moving, and poignant.  A Broken Dream.

Art, Authenticity, Beauty, Being True To Yourself, Blundering Criticisms, Critiques, Free Spirit, Life, Living, Nature, Observation, Outstanding Bloggers, People, Photography, Quality of Life, Robin, Spirituality, The Art of Living Well, Well Being, Writing

Walking With Robin

(About a 2 minute read)

“The morning sunlight, in the spring, bounces off the sconces on the pendulum lights [in my kitchen] and creates a star-like pattern on the ceiling.  It’s a signal that spring has arrived.” — Robin, Breezes at Dawn Blog [Brackets Paul’s].

Anyone wishing to find his or her own true voice — but who is uncertain what that means — would do well to study Robin’s posts on her blog, Breezes at Dawn.

Of course, it is nearly impossible today to express a wholly new idea, especially outside the sciences.  Those who do now and then manage to come up with something even approaching a wholly new idea tend to be keen observers, rather than creative alone.

Robin is quite obviously a keen observer (see above quote), but — offhand — I can’t recall her expressing any more original ideas than the rest of us.  What makes her voice her own are not the ideas she expresses, but the virtually unique and special way in which she expresses them.

In short, her style.

Continue reading “Walking With Robin”

Critiques, From Around the Net, Internet, Life, Outstanding Bloggers, Parihkit Dutta, Stolen From The Blogosphere

“Bahadur: The Expatriate” by Parakhit Dutta

(About a 2 minute read)

“This needs to be read by the world…” — Akarsh Jain

I see no reason to suppose that bloggers cannot now and then produce posts that have all the merits of world class literature.  I don’t even think you need to be a world class critic to point that out.

It is quite true that few, if any of us bloggers set out to intentionally produce something of universal and timeless value — something that ought to be on school and university reading lists for centuries.  After all, why should we?

Yet, what is to prevent someone from now and then doing it?  Doing it in all likelihood unintentionally.

I can think of only one objection to the notion that our lowly blogging community cannot now and then produce something the equal of any short work or essay produced by a Montesquieu, Cicero, Pritam, Emerson, Mengzi, or Orwell.

“No world class critic thinks we can.”

But I doubt there are many genuinely world class critics who themselves would make such an argument for in the end, that argument does not hold water.  It amounts to little more than saying “blogging has been overlooked by critics, therefore there is nothing to find in the blogosphere.”

So far as I can see, Parakhit Dutta’s Bahadur: The Expatriate is a universal and timeless work of literature.  Anyone, from any culture, at anytime in history could benefit — could have their lives enriched — by reading it.  Here’s an excerpt:

“…my uncle was someone who had never looked at Bahadur condescendingly, while everybody [else] treated him as though he were an eye-sore, a tiny, irritating thorn, that needs be plucked out at once! He was scolded, berated, shouted at and one hysterical woman had claimed that Bahadur had on purpose touched her, a grave sin for he was an untouchable. Men found pleasure in beating him up…”

I don’t know how you could fault that passage.  I don’t know what methods of accounting could possibly bottom line it as anything less that excellent.  Moreover, the entire rest of Parakhit’s post does not flag from the high standards of that excerpt.

Bahadur can be found here.


Off the top of my head tonight, I can suggest two other posts any interested person will want to read:

Jane Basil’s hilarious poem Promises

The Ederran’s reflections in Observing Surroundings

Art, Artist, Critiques, From Around the Net, Outstanding Bloggers, People, Poetry

Blog Critique: “Lunarpoet”

(About a 1 minute read)

The Lunarpoet Blog, by Matthias

You cannot help but wish this young man well.  Matthias sees himself as a poet who is, “..searching for the magic sparks in the interspaces, between the cracks of reality”, and it is easy to prove that he is a talented conjurer of that magic.

This is no ordinary poetry blog.  Make no mistake about that.  Matthias has dedicated himself to the lifelong pursuit of pushing his talents and skills with words as far as they can go — and he might just one day be a voyager to the stars.

Most of his poetry is blank verse of moderate length and can be read in about a minute each.  But you might want to spend more time than that, savoring his works.  They are good quality poems even when compared to the great, traditional poets of history.  Someday, he might be up there among them himself.

This is solely a matter of personal taste, but I think Matthais and Jane Basil are the two best poets that I’ve come across in my surfing of up to 20 blogs a day.

The Lunarpoet blog is dedicated to poetry and publishes no other material than that.  Though Matthias’ native language is German, all the poems are in English, and all of them are written in accessible language.

 


FULL DISCLOSURE: This review was part of an arrangement between Matthias and I to review each other’s blogs.  His review of my blog can be found here.

Anger, Critiques, Emotions, Outstanding Bloggers, Sexuality, Sledpress

Poetry Critique:“To Carmen, Upon Belting Him One”, by Sledpress

(About a 4 minute read)

Dear Readers,

Sometime ago I spent a lovely afternoon in the Manitou Public Library reading a book of advice to poets.  The author was convinced that the secret to great poetry was “swing”.

More than anything else — including rhyme, meaning, imagery, etc — a great poem had to have swing.  By which he meant that the lines had to more or less seesaw back and forth.

Any theory of poetry that focuses us on just one trait to declare it the single most important trait is, of course, easy to quickly dismiss.  But before we dismiss this swing theory, I think we should consider a couple things about it.

Continue reading “Poetry Critique:“To Carmen, Upon Belting Him One”, by Sledpress”

Alienation, Angst, Critiques, Jane Paterson Basil, Life, Outstanding Bloggers, Poetry, Quality of Life

Poetry Critique: “Existential Angst” by Jane

(About a 6 minute read)

Dear Reader,

I have on occasion wondered whether it was possible to compose existential angst poetry without, however, coming across as so much whining.

The occasions have usually been when someone has asked me to read an angst-ridden poem of theirs.  That hasn’t happened recently, but it used to be fairly common back in the days I hung out with a lot of young people in their teens and early twenties.

So far as I can recall, the one thing all those poems shared was that they came across as whining.  Some of the poems were quite powerful: I still recall one that I thought at the time was so moving it could force me to eat three-o’clock-in-the-morning darkness.

Continue reading “Poetry Critique: “Existential Angst” by Jane”

Art, Critiques, Poetry

Paul Sunstone, Poetry Critic: Guaranteed Gentle, Honest, Blundering

Looking for some kicks?

Feel like getting a possibly new, unique, and almost certainly blundering take on your poetry?

Simply clue me in to where your work is posted, then stand back out of the way as I rush over to review it like a horny dog rushing over to hump a soon-to-be appalled lamp post.

Here are my Three Guarantees to you of a good critique:

Gentle.  No savage criticisms of you or your poems.  Just real insights.

Honest. If I don’t think something is true of your poetry, I won’t BS you that it is.

Best Effort.  I don’t know what I’m doing, but I will certainly give it my best effort.

Fair enough?  Please post a link to your work.  Or better yet, share this message far and wide — and/or then post a link to your work.