From Around the Net, Stolen From The Blogosphere

A Charming Meme

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I found this charming and amusing meme on Jyoti’s blog. Check it out here.  At first, I was a bit confused and thought Jyoti had come up with the saying herself.  But as it happens, there are several variations on this meme to be found on the net.  I happen to like the variation I found on Jyoti’s blog the best, and which you see above.

Andrea Dinardo, Carla, Eudaimonia, From Around the Net, Human Nature, Life, Living, Love, Outstanding Bloggers, Quality of Life, Resilience, Self-Flourishing, Stolen From The Blogosphere, The Art of Living Well, Well Being, Wisdom

Is the Difference Love?

Break yourself.
Or have someone else do it.
(It’s easy. You’re frail, you know.)

Throw yourself into the ocean.
(Don’t be afraid.
It’s like baptism.)

Grinding tides
…lullabies…
(with a bite)

Don’t fight.
(Surrender.)

Seasons scour, gales rend
Breakers crest,
And in the end

You are precious.
(A jewel.)

How to Make Sea Glass, by the gifted Carla, Carla’s Corner.


 

“At least 99.9% of everything good in my life has come to me through the door of pain.” — Dr. Andrea Dinardo, Thriving Under Pressure.


 

(About a 3 minute read)

It’s curious to me how much truth there is to the notion exquisitely expressed in Carla’s poem that we can come to be better people through adversity and suffering.

It is equally curious to me how much truth there is to the notion insightfully expressed by Andrea that most — or perhaps almost all — of the good things in our lives are in one way or another born of our pain and suffering.

I think both ideas might seem at first to be counter-intuitive.   Does not pain and suffering focus us on ourselves, make us self-centered — perhaps even bitter and cynical?   If so, how can it turn us into jewels?

Again, how can good things come of bad things?  How can blessings enter our lives through the door of pain and suffering?

Continue reading “Is the Difference Love?”

Failure, From Around the Net, Goals, Life, Living, Resilience, Success, The Art of Living Well

Failure and Resilience

(About a 2 minute read)

Bob was a university president and — with his wife, Edith — a frequent dinner guest at our table while I was in high school.  I recall one evening Bob used a word new to me. Vita.

“Oh, I mean a curriculum vitae, Paul.” Bob said as an aside in answer to my question.  He all too quickly hastened back to what he’d been talking about.  I could tell by his smile he was merely pretending that he had sufficiently explained to me what a vita was.

“Wait!  What’s a curriculum vitae?”

Bob looked at me in triumph that I had risen to his bait.  Then his expression suddenly changed to fake, drop-jaw shock.  “You don’t know…let’s be sure about this…you do not know what a curriculum vitae is?

Continue reading “Failure and Resilience”

Adolescent Sexuality, Bad Ideas, Cultural Traits, Culture, Erotic Love, Ethics, Free Spirit, From Around the Net, Fun, Horniness, Human Nature, Jane Paterson Basil, Judgementalism, Learning, Life, Living, Love, Morality, Morals, New Love, Play, Seduction, Self, Self Identity, Self Image, Self-determination, Self-Flourishing, Self-Knowledge, Sex, Sexuality, Sexualization, Society, Stolen From The Blogosphere, Village Idiots

The Feral Sexuality of Teenage Girls

(About a 6 minute read)

It is easy to fall for the cliché that ours is the most sexually liberated age in history.  It might be actually closer to the truth if we were to think of ourselves as among the most sexually complicated ages in history.

Continue reading “The Feral Sexuality of Teenage Girls”

Art, Blog Awards, Blundering Criticisms, Critiques, From Around the Net, Gifts for Comments, Jane Paterson Basil, Poetry

I Need Your Help With a Housewarming Party!

I need your help to hold a housewarming party for Jane Basil at her new blog.  The door prize for helping out is a 30 USD shopping trip on Amazon.

If I came across a Jane Basil poem published in the Oxford Companion to English Poetry, I would not think it out of place.

Skeptical?  Go and read Promises!  Read just that one Basil poem.  Then tell me whether you concur with me.  Your call, but please don’t make your call until at least you have read Promises.

Continue reading “I Need Your Help With a Housewarming Party!”

From Around the Net, Stolen From The Blogosphere

“Our Peers Start Praising Us…”

A quote that appeared this morning on Tylor’s Blog:

“Here’s something that makes me smile these days. As people like you and me get older, our peers start praising us for the very same reasons we once annoyed them. Go figure!

“Not everyone, of course, but enough to make it amusing.”

Check it out here.

Critiques, From Around the Net, Poetry

“A Broken Dream”, by Ramyani Bhattacharya

The first thing to strike me about A Broken Dream by Ramyani Bhattacharya is the imagery, the vibrant, sensuous imagery.  Her imagery made me feel her words.

The other of the top two things to strike me about her poem was the poignancy of its ending verses.

Strikingly beautiful, moving, and poignant.  A Broken Dream.

Critiques, From Around the Net, Internet, Life, Outstanding Bloggers, Parihkit Dutta, Stolen From The Blogosphere

“Bahadur: The Expatriate” by Parakhit Dutta

(About a 2 minute read)

“This needs to be read by the world…” — Akarsh Jain

I see no reason to suppose that bloggers cannot now and then produce posts that have all the merits of world class literature.  I don’t even think you need to be a world class critic to point that out.

It is quite true that few, if any of us bloggers set out to intentionally produce something of universal and timeless value — something that ought to be on school and university reading lists for centuries.  After all, why should we?

Yet, what is to prevent someone from now and then doing it?  Doing it in all likelihood unintentionally.

I can think of only one objection to the notion that our lowly blogging community cannot now and then produce something the equal of any short work or essay produced by a Montesquieu, Cicero, Pritam, Emerson, Mengzi, or Orwell.

“No world class critic thinks we can.”

But I doubt there are many genuinely world class critics who themselves would make such an argument for in the end, that argument does not hold water.  It amounts to little more than saying “blogging has been overlooked by critics, therefore there is nothing to find in the blogosphere.”

So far as I can see, Parakhit Dutta’s Bahadur: The Expatriate is a universal and timeless work of literature.  Anyone, from any culture, at anytime in history could benefit — could have their lives enriched — by reading it.  Here’s an excerpt:

“…my uncle was someone who had never looked at Bahadur condescendingly, while everybody [else] treated him as though he were an eye-sore, a tiny, irritating thorn, that needs be plucked out at once! He was scolded, berated, shouted at and one hysterical woman had claimed that Bahadur had on purpose touched her, a grave sin for he was an untouchable. Men found pleasure in beating him up…”

I don’t know how you could fault that passage.  I don’t know what methods of accounting could possibly bottom line it as anything less that excellent.  Moreover, the entire rest of Parakhit’s post does not flag from the high standards of that excerpt.

Bahadur can be found here.


Off the top of my head tonight, I can suggest two other posts any interested person will want to read:

Jane Basil’s hilarious poem Promises

The Ederran’s reflections in Observing Surroundings

Amanda Reilly Sayer, Art, Creative Thinking, Creativity, Eudaimonia, Free Spirit, From Around the Net, Fun, Happiness, Ideas, Life, Living, Outstanding Bloggers, Play, Quality of Life, Self-determination, Self-Flourishing, Talents and Skills, Well Being

In Which I Savage Amanda Reilly Sayer’s Most Recent Post

A kind man, a humane man, a fair and just man would sing to you, Dear Readers.  Sing nothing less or other than full-throated words of praise for Amanda Reilly Sayer’s most recent post.

By gods! He’d sing loud of Amanda Reilly Sayer, and of her post!  And he’d be doing it for you, Dear Readers, he’d be doing it for your own benefit.  He’d say, “Treat yourself today to what deep down you know you deserve now and then: A damn good post.”

That’s what a fair and just man would do — both for Amanda and for you.

Continue reading “In Which I Savage Amanda Reilly Sayer’s Most Recent Post”

Abuse, Abusive Relationships, Bad Ideas, Baffy, Emotional Abuse, Fairness, From Around the Net, Honesty, Human Nature, Humanism, Liars Lies and Lying, Oppression, Outstanding Bloggers, Physical Abuse, Psychological Abuse, Racism, Relationships, Self Identity, Self Image, Sexual Abuse, Society, Stolen From The Blogosphere, Values, Verbal Abuse, Village Idiots

I Shamelessly Stole From Baffled Mum Today

Baffled Mum’s post today, “Who Will Miss You?” is an outstanding illustration of why I like to steal things.

That’s my polite way of saying the idea for this post is stolen from a post of hers.

[Back story] Baffy — as she kindly allows me to call her — Baffy overheard some jerk rhetorically asking someone, “Who will miss you!”  Being foolishly in possession of a heart just as big as her mind (Which seems at least big enough to embrace most anything she wants it to embrace), Baffy posted a concise, surgically accurate response on her blog. Nailed him, she did!  Didn’t call him out by name, but nailed him right properly and good. [/back story]

Here’s my favorite Baffy quote of them all, “Who are we to judge the worth of people anyway?”

Yay!  You go, Baffy! Stick it to that dragon!  That dragon of unnecessary and unwarranted ranking of ourselves and others.

All I want to know is just which god slammed a ten-foot high judge’s bench under the exalted butts of possibly three-quarters or more of humanity?

Call me crazy if you must, but somehow, I doubt anything divine had a hand in placing those benches under those butts.  Somehow, I smell the profane stench of self-righteous self-appointment.  Just ain’t nothing sacred about them benches at all, so far as I can see.

I agree with everything Baffy said today.  Just I want to add this.  Each and every act of abuse the world sees moment to moment of each minute of the day is to me evidence of our co-equality when it comes to our most fundamental human worth.

Every act of abuse from the father’s too sharp criticism of his child to the dictator’s bloody genocide, is evidence of why we must treat each other as equals in basic human worth.

Abuse — it all adds up to a price, a cost, humanity simply hasn’t got it to pay off.

Creativity, Cultural Change, Cultural Traits, Culture, Enlightenment, From Around the Net, Goals, Human Nature, Invention, Jiddu Krishnamurti, Life, Meaning, New Idea, Purpose, Quality of Life, Religion, Spirituality, Thinking, Truth

“It Was so Obvious, No One Understood it at All”

(about a 5 minute read)

So often in life, the obvious masks a truth rather than…well, rather than makes a truth obvious.  I suspect that’s because when we think something is obvious, we have a tendency to look no further than it.

“That’s obvious.  Case closed.”

You notice a pretty girl strongly favors red clothing, which goes strikingly well with her dark hair and complexion, and her blue eyes.  It’s obvious why red is her favorite color, so you never ask her what her favorite is.

Continue reading ““It Was so Obvious, No One Understood it at All””

Allies, Brotherly Love, Capitalism, Citizenship, Community, Competition, Consumerism, Cultural Traits, Culture, Fairness, Free Market Capitalism, Friends, From Around the Net, Giving, Human Nature, Life, Morality, Obligations to Society, Philos, Society, Values

Never Break the Circle

(About a 1 minute read)

Years ago, there was Mike,
A Native American man who belonged
To the people of a Southwest nation,
And who was trying to teach his son
The people’s traditional values.

Can you imagine how tough that was?
Maybe the values are the same
But the world is not.
No, it’s not the same at all.
But Mike was determined,
Still made the effort.

Each weekend he drove his boy
Eight hundred miles South
To the villages where
He could play with his cousins,
Talk with his grandparents,
Learn from the whole village
How to walk with one foot on the earth,
And with the other foot firmly planted
In the spirit world.

His son made Mike proud.
Once the whole community
Gathered to share candy —
I think Mike called it,
“Halloween, Hopi style.”

Forming a circle of young and old,
The people tossed the candies around
For several minutes, catching and tossing
Back the candies, the people shared
A good thing in life, and stopped
Only when everyone had something sweet.

Everyone.

“Cooperation”, Mike told me,
“It’s how the people live.
Not like what he learns in school.
There it’s fight for yourself,
Live for your close kin alone,
And screw all the rest.”